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Drew Day of Scholars

Annual celebration of student achievement

April 2020 – Drew University’s annual Day of Scholars event went virtual in 2020.

During a two-hour interactive event live-streamed on YouTube, 15 Drew students delivered 5-minute research presentations, musical performances and poetry readings before answering viewer questions.

The virtual atmosphere was filled with positive feedback and insightful questions in the live chat, as well as a few impromptu moments of levity.

When answering a technical question about her flute following a performance of Mozart’s “Concerto in G Major,” Cristabella Fortna C’23 was happy to expose her inner “nerd.”

“Day of Scholars is all about celebrating our inner nerd,” assured Debra Liebowitz, Provost & Dean of the College of Liberal Arts & the Caspersen School of Graduate Studies, who moderated the virtual event.

Check out the full virtual event below, watch the 29 individually-recorded presentations, performances and readings from 44 participating students and check out the Senior Art Show.

Watch the Recap of the Live Event

Program:


Check out the Senior Art Show on Instagram
@senior_studio_2020

Angel Doughert Elizabeth Schafer Hai Anh Phan Jessica Corujo Vanessa Crespi Kirstin Waldmann Kiyah Colson Kristina Olsen Lydia SegalMaría José Navas Espinal Méa Rose St Amour Sami Strathern Shirley Zheng Weronika Teresa Klisiewicz Yue Wang

Drew University hosted an inaugural lecture on diversity and inclusion, featuring Dr. Ruchi Chaturvedi, senior lecturer at the University of Cape Town (UCT). She is a political and legal anthropologist who works on cultures of democracy, popular politics, and political violence in postcolonial democracies. Her talk was entitled “Fallist Movements and the Curriculum: Reflections on Teaching and Learning from the University of Cape Town.” 

The event was hosted by the Arts & Sciences Dean’s Office and facilitated and organized by Associate Dean of Curriculum and Professor of Political Science and International Relations Jinee Lokaneeta. Lokaneeta highlighted Drew's increasing diversity and emphasized the university's commitment to equity and inclusion. 

Dr. Chaturvedi discussed the impact of the Rhodes Must Fall protest at UCT in 2015, which sparked movements against colonial legacies in South African higher education. She emphasized the need to decolonize curricula globally, drawing attention to the intersection of race and class in South Africa.

Dr. Chaturvedi shared examples of segregation at UCT and the subsequent efforts to transform the curriculum, inspired by Mahmood Mamdani's work. She challenged the false binary between excellence and transformation in education, advocating for their interconnectedness. The event prompted reflection on colonial education models and the importance of representation. 

Dr. Chaturvedi reminded the community that restructuring is an ongoing process, particularly in curricular changes that align with diversity. The conclusion featured a lively Q&A session, emphasizing the significance of continuous forward movement in education and societal change. 

#drewuniversity #newjerseyschools #drewcommunity #collegeofliberalarts #caspersenschool #drewtheologicalschool

Drew University hosted an inaugural lecture on diversity and inclusion, featuring Dr. Ruchi Chaturvedi, senior lecturer at the University of Cape Town (UCT). She is a political and legal anthropologist who works on cultures of democracy, popular politics, and political violence in postcolonial democracies. Her talk was entitled “Fallist Movements and the Curriculum: Reflections on Teaching and Learning from the University of Cape Town.”

The event was hosted by the Arts & Sciences Dean’s Office and facilitated and organized by Associate Dean of Curriculum and Professor of Political Science and International Relations Jinee Lokaneeta. Lokaneeta highlighted Drew`s increasing diversity and emphasized the university`s commitment to equity and inclusion.

Dr. Chaturvedi discussed the impact of the Rhodes Must Fall protest at UCT in 2015, which sparked movements against colonial legacies in South African higher education. She emphasized the need to decolonize curricula globally, drawing attention to the intersection of race and class in South Africa.

Dr. Chaturvedi shared examples of segregation at UCT and the subsequent efforts to transform the curriculum, inspired by Mahmood Mamdani`s work. She challenged the false binary between excellence and transformation in education, advocating for their interconnectedness. The event prompted reflection on colonial education models and the importance of representation.

Dr. Chaturvedi reminded the community that restructuring is an ongoing process, particularly in curricular changes that align with diversity. The conclusion featured a lively Q&A session, emphasizing the significance of continuous forward movement in education and societal change.

#drewuniversity #newjerseyschools #drewcommunity #collegeofliberalarts #caspersenschool #drewtheologicalschool
...

Drew’s Caspersen School of Graduate Studies Medical & Health Humanities program kicked off their new Alum Colloquia series by welcoming Dr. Lauren A. Jutchenko G’14, vice president of risk management & patient experience at Sun River Health.

She presented “Putting Patients First: Leveraging Patient Feedback to Improve the Patient Experience.”

Jutchenko co-chairs the Patient Experience Team Committee at Sun River Health, a group tasked with monitoring the entire patient experience. They gather patient feedback via telephone, text, or email surveys, using the results to highlight areas of strength and weaknesses to inform quality improvement efforts.

In addition, a consumer advisory committee is in place to monitor the survey results and take action when needed. Patients are invited to meetings and focus groups to gain experience feedback and vet new materials and programs.

Jutchenko thanks Drew for her experience in the Medical & Health Humanities program. “My time at Drew really shaped me as a person,” she said. “I worked to improve care and services through the organization that I work with. And not only that, I also find that those principles shape me on the day to day, and my personal life, as well.”

“The Medical & Health Humanities Program recognizes the invaluable contribution of its alums who serve as the backbone of the program,” said Director of the Medical & Health Humanities program Merel Visse. “Through partnerships with various hospitals and public health institutions where many alums are employed, our program can be at the forefront of care and serve its students by offering real-time learning experiences. Alums, unlike anyone else, understand the importance of humanizing care through the medical & health humanities lens. They are living the questions every day, and they need to respond to everyday challenges. Not an easy responsibility, but they can count on each other and on our program while improving health care.”

#drewuniversity #drewgraduate #drewalumni #medicalprogram #sunriverhealth#medicalhumanities

Drew’s Caspersen School of Graduate Studies Medical & Health Humanities program kicked off their new Alum Colloquia series by welcoming Dr. Lauren A. Jutchenko G’14, vice president of risk management & patient experience at Sun River Health.

She presented “Putting Patients First: Leveraging Patient Feedback to Improve the Patient Experience.”

Jutchenko co-chairs the Patient Experience Team Committee at Sun River Health, a group tasked with monitoring the entire patient experience. They gather patient feedback via telephone, text, or email surveys, using the results to highlight areas of strength and weaknesses to inform quality improvement efforts.

In addition, a consumer advisory committee is in place to monitor the survey results and take action when needed. Patients are invited to meetings and focus groups to gain experience feedback and vet new materials and programs.

Jutchenko thanks Drew for her experience in the Medical & Health Humanities program. “My time at Drew really shaped me as a person,” she said. “I worked to improve care and services through the organization that I work with. And not only that, I also find that those principles shape me on the day to day, and my personal life, as well.”

“The Medical & Health Humanities Program recognizes the invaluable contribution of its alums who serve as the backbone of the program,” said Director of the Medical & Health Humanities program Merel Visse. “Through partnerships with various hospitals and public health institutions where many alums are employed, our program can be at the forefront of care and serve its students by offering real-time learning experiences. Alums, unlike anyone else, understand the importance of humanizing care through the medical & health humanities lens. They are living the questions every day, and they need to respond to everyday challenges. Not an easy responsibility, but they can count on each other and on our program while improving health care.”

#drewuniversity #drewgraduate #drewalumni #medicalprogram #sunriverhealth#medicalhumanities
...

Dr. Emily A. Phifer G’22 helps herself and other process grief

She has spent her entire career in education, teaching various ages from infants and toddlers all the way to graduate students. 

After retirement and caring for a sick relative, Phifer asked herself “what about me, what do I do now?” Already earning two master’s degrees, Phifer came to Drew’s Caspersen School of Graduate Studies to earn her doctorate in Arts & Letters. “I’m going for it, gray hair and all,” she said.

Phifer has encountered great loss in her life, losing her mother when she was five, followed by her grandmother when she was six. While studying grief in literature during one of her first classes at Drew, she realized that she had never dealt with her own grief—an aha moment that turned the direction of her dissertation.

 “I had not owned and dealt with my own grief and loss, and if I had, it was unconscious to me,” she said. “It was then that I decided to write about grief and loss and how this can contribute to healing. 

I didn’t want to write a paper about me, but I wanted to write a paper that spoke to me because I needed to hear what it had to say. I was a witness and an audience. For my own healing process, I need to hear what the paper was explaining.”

“When I wrote this paper, I had the feeling I did what they [Phifer’s mother and grandmother] wanted me to do. It was a relief.”

While retired from full-time work, Phifer is “moving full steam ahead” in her part-time ventures as an adjunct professor at Rutgers University, teaching a graduate-level course on corrective and diagnostic reading. “Some people live their lives by their age,” she said. “I don’t.” In addition, she speaks with various healing groups, utilizing her research and knowledge of grief and loss to help others.

She says this work of doing for others is giving. “I’m at a point in my life where I can be strictly academic and clinical. It’s my healing, but I have enough to give to them.”

I am thankful that I was at Drew and meeting the people that I did at that time in my life,” said Phifer of her experience at Drew. 

#drewuniversity#drewalumni#artletter #newjerseyschools #graduateschool#drewalumni

Dr. Emily A. Phifer G’22 helps herself and other process grief

She has spent her entire career in education, teaching various ages from infants and toddlers all the way to graduate students.

After retirement and caring for a sick relative, Phifer asked herself “what about me, what do I do now?” Already earning two master’s degrees, Phifer came to Drew’s Caspersen School of Graduate Studies to earn her doctorate in Arts & Letters. “I’m going for it, gray hair and all,” she said.

Phifer has encountered great loss in her life, losing her mother when she was five, followed by her grandmother when she was six. While studying grief in literature during one of her first classes at Drew, she realized that she had never dealt with her own grief—an aha moment that turned the direction of her dissertation.

“I had not owned and dealt with my own grief and loss, and if I had, it was unconscious to me,” she said. “It was then that I decided to write about grief and loss and how this can contribute to healing.

I didn’t want to write a paper about me, but I wanted to write a paper that spoke to me because I needed to hear what it had to say. I was a witness and an audience. For my own healing process, I need to hear what the paper was explaining.”

“When I wrote this paper, I had the feeling I did what they [Phifer’s mother and grandmother] wanted me to do. It was a relief.”

While retired from full-time work, Phifer is “moving full steam ahead” in her part-time ventures as an adjunct professor at Rutgers University, teaching a graduate-level course on corrective and diagnostic reading. “Some people live their lives by their age,” she said. “I don’t.” In addition, she speaks with various healing groups, utilizing her research and knowledge of grief and loss to help others.

She says this work of doing for others is giving. “I’m at a point in my life where I can be strictly academic and clinical. It’s my healing, but I have enough to give to them.”

I am thankful that I was at Drew and meeting the people that I did at that time in my life,” said Phifer of her experience at Drew.

#drewuniversity#drewalumni#artletter #newjerseyschools #graduateschool#drewalumni
...

Drew University hosted a Dismantling Hatred Colloquium, a timely event jointly sponsored by Drew’s Center on Religion, Culture, and Conflict (CRCC) and the Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study.

The event explored ongoing conversations as part of the CRCC’s New Jersey Institute of Emerging Leaders program, designed for students to learn directly from experienced thought leaders in the world of peacebuilding and conflict transformation. The program prepares young leaders to foster peaceful and pluralistic relations in their communities, using religion as a positive force.

Featured guest speakers were Tamara Meyer NMT, author, therapist, lecturer, and media consultant, and daughter of German Jewish Holocaust survivors; and Arno Michaelis, filmmaker, author, public speaker, and former white supremacist. The two have combined forces professionally to dismantle hate from their unique perspectives and experiences.

As a daughter of holocaust survivors, Meyer learned that reconciliation and peace are possible. But she also learned that the world is not a safe place for a Jewish person and is concerned about the uptick in antisemitism resulting from the Israel-Hamas war. “Because of this, it’s even more important for me to find peace and forgiveness and a way to bridge the chasm of hatred, it has not been an easy path,” she said. “No matter how awful people have been treated, there’s always a possibility of reconciliation.”

Michaelis offered a detailed and open account of his dark past as a former violent racist neo-Nazi skinhead, driven by antisemitism, a direction he took due to self-hatred. “The reason I found it necessary to hate others is because I hated myself,” he said. Through persistent kindness and welcoming by those he learned to hate, Michaelis turned away from neo-Nazism and eventually found a path working in counter violent extremism. “I was treated with kindness when I least deserved it, but needed it the most,” he said.

#drewcaspersenatdrew #drewuniversity #drewtheologicalschool #drewcrcc #newjerseyschool

Drew University hosted a Dismantling Hatred Colloquium, a timely event jointly sponsored by Drew’s Center on Religion, Culture, and Conflict (CRCC) and the Center for Holocaust/Genocide Study.

The event explored ongoing conversations as part of the CRCC’s New Jersey Institute of Emerging Leaders program, designed for students to learn directly from experienced thought leaders in the world of peacebuilding and conflict transformation. The program prepares young leaders to foster peaceful and pluralistic relations in their communities, using religion as a positive force.

Featured guest speakers were Tamara Meyer NMT, author, therapist, lecturer, and media consultant, and daughter of German Jewish Holocaust survivors; and Arno Michaelis, filmmaker, author, public speaker, and former white supremacist. The two have combined forces professionally to dismantle hate from their unique perspectives and experiences.

As a daughter of holocaust survivors, Meyer learned that reconciliation and peace are possible. But she also learned that the world is not a safe place for a Jewish person and is concerned about the uptick in antisemitism resulting from the Israel-Hamas war. “Because of this, it’s even more important for me to find peace and forgiveness and a way to bridge the chasm of hatred, it has not been an easy path,” she said. “No matter how awful people have been treated, there’s always a possibility of reconciliation.”

Michaelis offered a detailed and open account of his dark past as a former violent racist neo-Nazi skinhead, driven by antisemitism, a direction he took due to self-hatred. “The reason I found it necessary to hate others is because I hated myself,” he said. Through persistent kindness and welcoming by those he learned to hate, Michaelis turned away from neo-Nazism and eventually found a path working in counter violent extremism. “I was treated with kindness when I least deserved it, but needed it the most,” he said.

#drewcaspersenatdrew #drewuniversity #drewtheologicalschool #drewcrcc #newjerseyschool
...

Drew University’s Center for Counseling and Psychological Services has opened a new space—the Zen Den—for students to destress.

The Zen Den includes a massage chair, bean bag chairs, large cushions, yoga mats and blocks, soft lighting, aromatherapy, items for creative expression, and guides for breathing and grounding exercises.

“Students can create their personal plan of action for managing stress after using resources in the space,” said Audra Tonero, executive director of counseling and wellness.

“Students can come in and just be. This is a space where nothing has to happen. It is a space to facilitate calm, get away from the impact of constant technology, and do what is right for students when they’re here.”

The Center for Counseling and Psychological Services will soon add VR headsets for mindfulness, pop-up workshops for meditation sessions, mindfulness and grounding exercises, and yoga demonstrations to the Zen Den offerings, as well as collaborative events with campus partners.

Follow the center on Instagram at @drewcounseling for hours.

#drewuniversity #drewcounseling #drewacademy #newjerseyschool

Drew University’s Center for Counseling and Psychological Services has opened a new space—the Zen Den—for students to destress.

The Zen Den includes a massage chair, bean bag chairs, large cushions, yoga mats and blocks, soft lighting, aromatherapy, items for creative expression, and guides for breathing and grounding exercises.

“Students can create their personal plan of action for managing stress after using resources in the space,” said Audra Tonero, executive director of counseling and wellness.

“Students can come in and just be. This is a space where nothing has to happen. It is a space to facilitate calm, get away from the impact of constant technology, and do what is right for students when they’re here.”

The Center for Counseling and Psychological Services will soon add VR headsets for mindfulness, pop-up workshops for meditation sessions, mindfulness and grounding exercises, and yoga demonstrations to the Zen Den offerings, as well as collaborative events with campus partners.

Follow the center on Instagram at @drewcounseling for hours.

#drewuniversity #drewcounseling #drewacademy #newjerseyschool
...

“There should be no separation between your scholarship and your teaching”

Drew University’s Jonathan Golden, associate teaching professor of religious studies, director of Drew’s Center on Religion, Culture & Conflict (CRCC), as well as the program director of Drew’s Conflict Resolution & Leadership certificate program, joined us for our Focus on Faculty series, where we highlight the many accomplishments, research, and scholarship of Drew’s incredible faculty members.

Golden’s expertise in conflict resolution, interfaith dialogue, and peace and conflict studies is reflected in his courses and leadership. He is also a faculty leader for Drew’s Action Scholars, a unique, hands-on, take-action program for students who are passionate about leading social change. 

We sat down with Golden to discuss how his scholarship informs his students. Find the full article in our #Linktree.

#conflictresolution #GradSchool #drew #religiousstudies

“There should be no separation between your scholarship and your teaching”

Drew University’s Jonathan Golden, associate teaching professor of religious studies, director of Drew’s Center on Religion, Culture & Conflict (CRCC), as well as the program director of Drew’s Conflict Resolution & Leadership certificate program, joined us for our Focus on Faculty series, where we highlight the many accomplishments, research, and scholarship of Drew’s incredible faculty members.

Golden’s expertise in conflict resolution, interfaith dialogue, and peace and conflict studies is reflected in his courses and leadership. He is also a faculty leader for Drew’s Action Scholars, a unique, hands-on, take-action program for students who are passionate about leading social change.

We sat down with Golden to discuss how his scholarship informs his students. Find the full article in our #Linktree.

#conflictresolution #GradSchool #drew #religiousstudies
...